YouTuber launches brand at Walmart after creating it when he was 13

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  • YouTuber Fiona Frills just launched Frilliance, her skincare and beauty brand, at Walmart.
  • She created the brand at the age of 13 thanks to the savings she had popular youtube channel, as well as acting jobs.
  • Frills said social media plays a key role in his business, but physical retail is also important.

An 18-year-old YouTuber just launched her skincare and beauty brand at Walmart.

Fiona Frills, who declined to share her real name, founded the company when she was 13 through her popular YouTube channel. She now has 922,000 YouTube subscribers and 186,300 TikTok subscribers, and sells her products in more than 400 Walmart stores across the United States.

Frills was just 11 when she started her YouTube channel to discuss beauty, makeup and skincare.

But then her skin started to inflame.

“There were times when I wouldn’t stand in front of a certain window or certain light because I knew my skin would look so bad,” she said.

Frills told Insider that she stopped using skincare and makeup for a while and her skin looked noticeably better. So she researched the ingredients in the products and found that they were “terrible” for teens.

Her experience led her to launch her brand, Frilliance, to help other teens with their skin. Frills said she funded the launch using about $35,000 in savings from YouTube earnings and acting jobs.

While her friends stressed about homework, she worried about her website

Building such a young company “definitely has been difficult,” Frills said. This included being part of a creator incubator fund that suggested she quit the brand, she said.

Frills said his mother was the “backbone” of the business and handled back-end operations while Frills herself handled much of the front-end.

“I was super stressed and never really felt normal in any way,” Frills told Insider. “I was like, ‘oh my God, why am I stressing about a company at 14?’ In a way, it was a little weird; my friends were stressed out about homework and I was like, ‘Oh my God, my website is crashing.'”

Frills graduated from high school in 2019 and is now taking courses in marketing, sales, business and public speaking, which she says was difficult to balance with posting to her social media and the creation of his business.

Fiona Frills Frillance

Fiona Frills has over 900,000 YouTube subscribers and nearly 200,000 TikTok subscribers.

Steve DiBartolomeo


Frills said she had a few contractors who helped her with graphic design, photography, and web design, “but no full-time employees other than my mom and me.” Frills lives in Arizona, but the products are made in a lab in California, which employs about 170 people in total.

Frills said she spends around 70% of her time at Frilliance, split between activities such as posting to the brand’s social media accounts, researching ingredients, testing products and designing websites. . She devotes the remaining 30% of her time to her own social media presence.

Social media plays a huge role in his business because it’s “exactly where our demographics are,” Frills said. Fans review her products, Frilliance targets Facebook marketing at moms, and Frills herself even coaches people to become social media reps. The brand’s sales on Amazon have more than doubled during the pandemic, according to Frills.

But social media isn’t everything, Frills said, and that’s where the partnership with Walmart comes in. The target population for its products is largely young, which means not all of them have access to online shopping. Stocking produce at a retailer means tweens can buy the produce with their allowance or when grocery shopping with their mom, she said.

Frilliance’s products were launched at Walmart in March. The products are rolled out in approximately 430 stores spanning nearly every state under its Open Call program. Walmart’s website lists Frilliance’s lip glosses at $9.90 to $12.90, as well as product bundles costing up to $32.90.

“We are already seeing very good sales,” Frills said. “Walmart is issuing additional purchase orders beyond its original sales forecast.”

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